staten island neighborhoods

Staten Island, also known as Richmond County, has nearly 500,000 residents and is the least populated and most suburban of New York City’s five boroughs. It is bordered by Elizabeth, NJ to the west, Perth Amboy, NJ to the south, Brooklyn to the east, and Bayonne, NJ to the north. The borough is connected to New Jersey by three bridges and to Brooklyn by one bridge.

Covering a total area of 103 square miles, with 59 square miles of land, Staten Island ranks third among the city’s boroughs in land size. The island is divided into three parts: the North Shore, the Mid-Island, and the South Shore, each with unique neighborhoods and characteristics.

Staten Island is the only borough not connected to the NYC subway system, contributing to its distinct identity. A 25-minute ferry ride from Lower Manhattan, it features a rich history, museums, diverse immigrant communities, and Freshkills Park, a large green space developed on a former landfill site.

This guide will provide factual information about Staten Island’s neighborhoods, clear up misconceptions, and help you experience them like a local. Let’s begin and discover the unique appeal of each Staten Island neighborhood!

Staten Island Map

A Comprehensive List of Staten Island Neighborhoods

  • Annadale: This neighborhood is celebrated for its natural allure, with the Blue Heron Park Reserve serving as a haven for bird enthusiasts and nature walks.
  • Arden Heights: This is a residential area, distinguished by its “Georgetown” style homes and the Arden Heights Woods, the largest forest preserve on Staten Island.
  • Arlington: This is a residential neighborhood on the North Shore, notable for its multicultural community.
  • Arrochar: This neighborhood offers scenic vistas of the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge and is conveniently close to Fort Wadsworth.
  • Bay Terrace: This neighborhood is a fusion of residential and commercial spaces, with the Bay Terrace Shopping Center acting as a significant local nexus.
  • Bloomfield: This area is recognized for its industrial parks and the Teleport, an advanced office park.
  • Brighton Heights: This residential neighborhood is notable for its historic homes and tight-knit community spirit.
  • Bulls Head: This area is a blend of commercial and residential spaces, hosting numerous shopping plazas and the Staten Island Mall.
  • Castleton Corners: This residential neighborhood is notable for its tree-canopied streets and well-maintained homes.
  • Charleston: This area is recognized for its shopping centers and the Clay Pit Ponds State Park Preserve.
  • Clifton: This area is notable for its diverse community and waterfront parks.
  • Concord: This residential neighborhood is recognized for its historic homes and the Staten Island Academy.
  • Dongan Hills: This area is notable for its lively commercial district and the Staten Island University Hospital.
  • Egbertville: This small residential neighborhood is recognized for the Staten Island Greenbelt, a large network of interconnected parks.
  • Elm Park: This neighborhood is known for its urban density, unique transportation system, and landmarks like St. Mary’s Cemetery.
  • Eltingville: This residential neighborhood is recognized for its shopping centers and the Eltingville Transit Center.
  • Emerson Hill: This residential neighborhood is notable for its large, secluded homes.
  • Fort Wadsworth: This area is recognized for the historic Fort Wadsworth site and its panoramic views of New York Harbor.
  • Graniteville: This mixed residential and commercial neighborhood is notable for its historic granite quarries.
  • Grant City: This residential neighborhood is recognized for its historical significance, community spirit, and local amenities.
  • Grasmere: This area is notable for its scenic lakes and the Staten Island Railway’s Grasmere station.
  • Great Kills: This area is home to the Great Kills Park, a part of the Staten Island unit of the Gateway National Recreation Area, which offers beaches, marinas, and fishing areas.
  • Greenridge: This residential neighborhood is recognized for nearby parks and the Greenridge Shopping Plaza.
  • Grymes Hill: This area is notable for its historic homes, Wagner College, Casa Belvedere, and panoramic views of the New York Harbor.
  • Hamilton Park: This historic neighborhood is recognized for its Victorian homes and the Snug Harbor Cultural Center.
  • Heartland Village: This residential neighborhood is notable for its shopping centers and the New Springville Greenway.
  • Huguenot: This area is recognized for sheltering Huguenots in the late 17th and early 18th centuries, and offers a mix of single-family homes and apartment buildings.
  • Lighthouse Hill: This area is notable for the historic Staten Island Lighthouse and the Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art.
  • Livingston: This neighborhood boasts an abundance of attractive Tudor-style homes and is home to The Kreuzer-Pelton House.
  • Manor Heights: This residential neighborhood is notable for its proximity to the Staten Island Mall.
  • Mariners Harbor: This waterfront neighborhood is recognized for the Mariners Harbor Library and the historic Mariners Harbor Houses.
  • Meiers Corners: This residential neighborhood is notable for its shopping centers and the Staten Island School of Civic Leadership.
  • Midland Beach: This area is recognized for its boardwalk, beach, and the Midland Beach Promenade.
  • New Brighton: This area is notable for its diverse population, rich cultural institutions, and a variety of architectural styles dating back to the early 19th century.
  • New Dorp: This mixed commercial and residential neighborhood is recognized for its historic homes and the New Dorp Lane shopping district.
  • New Springville: This area is notable for the Staten Island Mall, Costco, the Freshkills Park, and the William T. Davis Wildlife Refuge.
  • Oakwood: This residential neighborhood is recognized for its beach and the historic Oakwood Heights station.
  • Old Place: This small residential neighborhood is notable for its historic homes and the Old Place Creek.
  • Old Town: This area is recognized for its historic district, the South Beach boardwalk, and the Ocean Breeze Athletic Complex.
  • Park Hill: This is a vibrant, densely urban neighborhood, known for its mix of medium-sized to small homes and a diverse community. 
  • Pleasant Plains: This residential neighborhood is notable for its marina and the Mount Loretto Unique Area.
  • Port Ivory: This predominantly industrial neighborhood is recognized for the Procter & Gamble Ivory Soap factory.
  • Port Richmond: Port Richmond is a neighborhood located on the North Shore of Staten Island, New York City. It is bordered by Kill van Kull, Clove Road, Forest Avenue, and the Bayonne Bridge. It is home to Port Richmond High School.
  • Prince’s Bay: This area is recognized for its historic homes, Lemon Creek Park, and the Seguine Mansion.
  • Randall Manor: This area is notable for its historic district, the Staten Island Zoo, and the Randall Manor Park.
  • Richmond Town: This area is notable for the Historic Richmond Town Museum, a collection of historic buildings from the 17th to the 19th centuries.
  • Richmond Valley: This area is recognized for its commercial district, and as the Staten Island terminus of the Outerbridge Crossing, connecting Staten Island to Perth Amboy, New Jersey, across the Arthur Kill.
  • Rosebank: This area is recognized for its historic homes, the Alice Austen House, the Garibaldi Meucci Museum, and the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge.
  • Rossville: This area is notable for its historic district, the Sandy Ground Historical Museum, and the Woodrow Plaza.
  • St. George: This area is recognized for the Staten Island Ferry, the Richmond County Bank Ballpark, and the St. George Theatre.
  • Sandy Ground: This area is notable for its historic district, the Sandy Ground Historical Museum, and its history as a settlement of free African Americans.
  • Shore Acres: This residential neighborhood is recognized for its scenic views of the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge.
  • Silver Lake: This area is notable for the Silver Lake Park, the Silver Lake Golf Course, and the Silver Lake Reservoir.
  • South Beach: This area is recognized for its boardwalk, beach, and the Franklin D. Roosevelt Boardwalk and Beach.
  • Stapleton: This area is notable for its historical district, vibrant street art scene, and multicultural shops.
  • Sunnyside: This residential neighborhood is notable for the Clove Lakes Park and the Staten Island Greenbelt.
  • Todt Hill: This area is recognized for its large homes, the Staten Island Academy, and the Richmond County Country Club.
  • Tompkinsville: This area is notable for the Staten Island Ferry, the Tompkinsville Park, and the Bay Street commercial district.
  • Tottenville: This area is recognized for its historic district, the Conference House Park, and the Tottenville Pool.
  • Travis-Chelsea: This area is notable for its Independence Day Parade, the William T. Davis Wildlife Refuge, for its peaceful atmosphere, rich history, and strong sense of community.
  • Ward Hill: This area is recognized for its historic district, the Ward Hill Lookout, and the Staten Island Armory.
  • West New Brighton: This area is notable for the Snug Harbor Cultural Center, the Staten Island Children’s Museum, and the West New Brighton Library.
  • Westerleigh: This area is recognized for its historic homes, the Westerleigh Park, and the Staten Island Cricket Club.
  • Willowbrook: This area is notable for the College of Staten Island, Willowbrook Park, and the Staten Island Greenbelt.
  • Woodrow: This area is recognized for its historic homes, the Woodrow Plaza, and Bloomingdale Park.

Each of these neighborhoods has its unique charm and features, making Staten Island a diverse and vibrant borough of New York City.

Interesting Facts

Staten Island ranks second in New York City for median earnings, just behind Manhattan. Income levels are more evenly distributed here compared to other boroughs. It also has the second-lowest poverty rate, after Queens. Staten Island residents have the highest median age among the five boroughs, with nearly 30 percent of the population being 55 or older.

Commuting in Staten Island differs from the rest of New York City. Two-thirds of Staten Island commuters drive to work, nearly three times the share of drivers in other boroughs. This highlights the borough’s suburban character and its well-developed road infrastructure.

Staten Island is home to a significant portion of New York City’s essential workers. It houses 39 percent of the city’s firefighters, one-fifth of its police officers, and one-tenth of its elementary and middle school teachers. These professionals play a crucial role in ensuring the safety, security, and education of both Staten Island and the entire city, underscoring the borough’s importance within New York City.

The Historical Significance of Staten Island Neighborhoods

A Walk-Through History

Staten Island neighborhoods are rich in history. From colonial-era buildings in Historic Richmond Town to Victorian homes in St. George, the borough serves as a living museum of New York City’s past. Walking through these neighborhoods offers a glimpse into the lives of the people who shaped Staten Island’s history.

Landmarks and Historic Sites

Staten Island neighborhoods feature significant landmarks and historic sites. The Conference House in Tottenville hosted a peace conference during the Revolutionary War. Fort Wadsworth, one of the oldest military installations in the country, offers views of the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge. The St. George Theatre is a cultural landmark.

Cultural Diversity Across Staten Island

A Melting Pot of Cultures

Staten Island neighborhoods reflect the borough’s cultural diversity. From Italian influences in Rosebank to the Sri Lankan community in Tompkinsville, each neighborhood showcases a blend of cultures. This diversity is evident in the food, festivals, and culture of Staten Island.

Outdoor Recreation and Natural Beauty in Staten Island

The Green Borough

Known as “The Borough of Parks,” Staten Island boasts many green areas. The extensive Greenbelt and Clove Lakes Park in Castleton Corners are just a few examples. Whether you’re an outdoor enthusiast, a fitness buff, or someone who enjoys a leisurely walk, Staten Island offers many opportunities to enjoy nature.

The Art and Culture Scene in Staten Island

A Borough of Creativity

Staten Island neighborhoods are vibrant with cultural and artistic activity. Local art galleries in St. George and live music spots in Stapleton add to the borough’s creative energy. The Snug Harbor Cultural Center and Botanical Garden in Randall Manor serve as a cultural hub, offering performances, exhibits, and festivals.

A Canvas for Street Art

Street art is another aspect of Staten Island’s cultural scene. Many areas feature murals and graffiti, bringing color and personality to the neighborhoods. These artistic expressions often tell the stories of the community and its residents.

Public Transportation and Accessibility

Connecting the Borough

Public transit is essential for daily life in Staten Island. The borough’s transportation system, including buses, trains, and the Staten Island Ferry, makes it easy for residents and visitors to get around.

Key Highways and Bridges

The Staten Island Expressway (I-278) connects northern Staten Island with Brooklyn via the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge and with I-95 in New Jersey via the Goethals Bridge. The Willowbrook Expressway (NY 440) connects I-278 and northern Staten Island with New Jersey via the Bayonne Bridge and the Outerbridge Crossing.

Public Transit Options

While Staten Island is not directly served by the NYC Subway system, it is well-connected through other public transportation. The MTA bus service and the Staten Island Railway (SIR) provide residents with access to various parts of the island. The Staten Island Ferry offers views of the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, and the Manhattan skyline.

Education and Schools Across Staten Island

The Foundation of Learning

Education is a cornerstone of Staten Island neighborhoods. The borough has various educational institutions, from elementary schools to high schools and colleges. The College of Staten Island in Willowbrook offers a range of degree programs.

Schools in Staten Island: A Closer Look

Each neighborhood in Staten Island has schools that meet the community’s needs. Specialized programs at Staten Island Technical High School in New Dorp and the community-centered approach of PS 35 in Sunnyside reflect the values of their neighborhoods.

The Impact of Education

Schools in Staten Island neighborhoods foster a culture of learning, encourage community involvement, and contribute to the neighborhood’s development. They prepare the next generation of Staten Island residents.

Real Estate Trends in Staten Island

The Real Estate Landscape

Staten Island neighborhoods offer diverse real estate options, from historic Victorian homes in St. George to modern condos in Stapleton. The real estate market is dynamic, and influenced by location, accessibility, and neighborhood amenities.

Neighborhoods on the Rise

Certain Staten Island neighborhoods are gaining popularity due to affordability, proximity to transportation, and community amenities. Tottenville and Great Kills offer a suburban feel with easy city access, attracting families. St. George and Stapleton are seeing more development, drawing a younger, urban-oriented demographic.

The Impact of Real Estate Trends

Real estate trends influence the demographic makeup, services, and character of Staten Island neighborhoods. Understanding these trends is crucial for anyone looking to live or invest in the area.

Local Businesses and Shopping

The Heartbeat of the Community

Local businesses are key to the economy and character of Staten Island neighborhoods. From family-owned restaurants in New Dorp to boutique shops in West Brighton, these businesses offer a personalized shopping experience.

Shopping Experiences

Each Staten Island neighborhood offers unique shopping options. The Staten Island Mall in Heartland Village is the borough’s largest shopping center. Antique shops in Historic Richmond Town and farmers markets in St. George reflect the diversity of Staten Island neighborhoods.

The Impact of Local Businesses

Local businesses create jobs, support the local economy, and contribute to the neighborhood’s identity. They are places where residents can gather, shop, and support their community.

Community Engagement and Events

The Power of Community

Community involvement is a hallmark of Staten Island neighborhoods. Volunteering at local food banks, participating in neighborhood clean-up initiatives, and attending community gatherings are ways residents contribute to their community.

Events in Staten Island: Bringing People Together

Community events, such as summer concerts at Snug Harbor and holiday parades in West Brighton, highlight the communal spirit of Staten Island. They provide opportunities for residents to engage with their neighbors and celebrate their community.

The Impact of Community Engagement

Community involvement and events foster unity, stimulate civic involvement, and enhance the quality of life in Staten Island neighborhoods. They embody the community spirit that makes Staten Island neighborhoods vibrant and dynamic places to live.

Debunking Common Misconceptions About Staten Island

A prevalent misunderstanding about Staten Island neighborhoods is that they are solely residential, lacking in cultural or entertainment offerings. Contrarily, Staten Island is a lively borough teeming with historical richness, cultural diversity, and a bustling arts landscape. With attractions ranging from the Snug Harbor Cultural Center and Botanical Garden to the Staten Island Museum, there’s an abundance of cultural sites to discover.

There’s a common misunderstanding that Staten Island is somewhat of an outpost, detached from the pulse of New York City. Yes, Staten Island may be the least densely populated of the five boroughs, and it may lack a direct subway link to Manhattan, but to label it as ‘inaccessible’ would be a gross misrepresentation. The Staten Island Ferry, a regular and complimentary service, ensures a seamless connection to and from Manhattan. Moreover, the borough boasts a comprehensive bus network and the Staten Island Railway, further enhancing its accessibility.

Some people believe that the neighborhoods in Staten Island lack natural beauty just like the other parts of New York City. But, let me show you that people call Staten Island the ‘Borough of Parks’ for a valid reason. The place is full of parks, beaches, and green spaces, including the famous Greenbelt. It is a vast network of parks and natural habitats that cover 2,800 acres of land. Besides, the place has a considerable amount of preserved woodland that is not common in other boroughs of NYC. This gives both inhabitants and visitors a remarkable chance to enjoy and admire nature within the city.

There’s a misconception that Staten Island neighborhoods don’t have a diverse food scene. On the contrary, Staten Island offers a wide array of dining options, reflecting the borough’s cultural diversity. From Italian fare in Rosebank to Sri Lankan cuisine in Tompkinsville, there’s a world of flavors to explore in Staten Island.

Lastly, it’s worth noting that some individuals may assume that all neighborhoods in Staten Island are alike. However, the truth is that each neighborhood has its distinct personality and qualities. For instance, St. George is known for its historic structures, while South Beach has a pleasant beachside atmosphere. Each community offers a distinct way of life. Staten Island is a borough that embodies different neighborhoods, all with their individual identities and distinctive community spirit.

Tools and Resources for Exploring Best Neighborhoods in Staten Island

Staten Island Ferry Schedule

The Staten Island Ferry is a free service provided by the City of New York. It’s a great way to travel between Staten Island and Manhattan while enjoying stunning views of the Statue of Liberty and the Manhattan skyline. Here is the Staten Island Ferry schedule.

Staten Island Bus and Railway Map

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) operates an extensive network of buses and a railway line in Staten Island. You can use these services to travel within the borough and to other parts of New York City. The bus and railway map can be found here.

Staten Island Parks and Recreation

Staten Island is known as the “Borough of Parks” due to its numerous parks, beaches, and green spaces. You can explore parks and recreation options in our Staten Island Parks guide.

FAQs

1) What is the wealthiest part of Staten Island?

The wealthiest part of Staten Island is often considered to be Todt Hill. This neighborhood is known for its large, luxurious homes and its high real estate prices.

2) What parts of Staten Island are expensive?

Todt Hill, Emerson Hill, and Grymes Hill are often considered some of the more expensive neighborhoods in Staten Island due to their large homes and desirable locations.

3) What are the different parts of Staten Island?

Staten Island is divided into three distinct parts: the North Shore, the Mid-Island, and the South Shore. Each part has its unique neighborhoods and characteristics.

4) Is Staten Island good to live in?

Yes, many people enjoy living in Staten Island due to its mix of urban and suburban living, its access to parks and natural beauty, and its strong sense of community.

5) What is the most populated neighborhood in Staten Island?

New Springville is one of the most populated neighborhoods in Staten Island, largely due to its location near the Staten Island Mall and other amenities.

6) What is the safest neighborhood in Staten Island?

Safety can vary and is subjective, but neighborhoods like Great Kills and Tottenville are often noted for their low crime rates and family-friendly environments.

7) What is the best neighborhood in Staten Island for families?

Many families enjoy living in neighborhoods like Westerleigh, Great Kills, and New Dorp due to their good schools, family-friendly amenities, and strong sense of community.

8) What is the cultural hub of Staten Island?

St. George is often considered the cultural hub of Staten Island, with attractions like the Staten Island Museum, the St. George Theatre, and the Staten Island Ferry.

9) What neighborhood in Staten Island has the best parks?

Willowbrook is home to the Greenbelt, a network of parks, trails, and natural areas that is considered one of the best park systems in Staten Island.

10) What is the most diverse neighborhood in Staten Island?

Stapleton is one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Staten Island, with a mix of cultures and communities that contribute to its vibrant atmosphere.

Conclusion

When you explore Staten Island’s neighborhoods, you step into a borough rich with history, cultural variety, and community. From the busy streets of St. George to the calm atmosphere of Willowbrook, each neighborhood offers a unique experience, enhancing Staten Island’s charm. Whether you are a long-time resident or new to the area, there is always something new to discover.

Staten Island isn’t just another borough; it’s a collection of neighborhoods, each with its own story. So, the next time you are in NYC, take the Staten Island Ferry and visit these neighborhoods yourself. You might find that Staten Island has more to offer than you ever expected.